Books About Food

I took two days off from work last week. This was when the status of my upcoming holiday was hanging in the balance - were we going or not? Would we be able to find a good deal or not? So I threw caution to the wind and thought, Diet be damned!

Despite all my previous efforts to attain the perfect beach body (a completely unrealistic dream, as I will forever be a perfectionist), I decided to indulge in afternoon tea on Thursday. This consisted of sandwiches, scones and cupcakes galore! You can see the pictures below. But I'd just like to add that I wasn't alone. I didn't eat all of that by myself. No, really!

All I managed to eat were the sandwiches, two small scones, a mini to-die-for white chocolate cupcake, half a chocolate macaroon, half a small (yes, small!) blueberry whoopie pie, and a couple other halves of equally minuscule cakes. Strangely, the items look much larger in the photographs than they were in reality. Ahem!
Sandwiches: asparagus and lettuce, tomato and mozarella, cucumber and cream cheese, cheddar, and egg and cress
Tier 1: Scones, Tier 2: Cupcakes and Tier 3: Assortment of different mini desserts
The stand that the desserts were placed on was made out of dark chocolate!
But I wasn't finished gorging on food just yet! I also went out out for breakfast the next morning. I opted for a full English breakfast, while my accomplice (also guilty of abandoning her diet) chose pancakes with blueberries, bananas, strawberries and maple syrup.

 

Whilst devouring all those calories, I started thinking about books and food. An odd combination, perhaps, but bear with me. Have you ever read a novel in which the descriptions of food have been so vivid and mouthwatering that you wanted to take a large bite out of the book in question? Have you been left salivating at the thought of tasting what the main character is devouring on the page? I know I have. 

Here's a list of some of the most tempting descriptions of food in books.


The bufriedo scene in Looking for Alaska  by John Green

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"A deep-fried bean burrito... I sank my teeth into the crunchy shell of my first bufriedo and experienced a culinary orgasm."


 Chocolat by Joanne Harris

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“The air is hot and rich with the scent of chocolate. Quite unlike the white powdery chocolate I knew as a boy, this has a throaty richness like the perfumed beans from the coffee stall on the market, a redolence of amaretto and tiramis├╣, a smoky, burned flavor that enters my mouth somehow and makes it water."


The start-of-term feast in Harry Potter 
and the Philosopher's Stone by J. K. Rowling

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“He had never seen so many things he liked to eat on one table: roast beef, roast chicken, pork chops and lamb chops, sausages, bacon and steak, boiled potatoes, roast potatoes, fries, Yorkshire pudding, peas, carrots, gravy, ketchup, and, for some strange reason, peppermint humbugs.’ 


Groosling soup in The Hunger Games 
by Suzanne Collins

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"I mince groosling until it’s practically mush and mash some of Rue’s roots... I put in the meat and roots... and go find something green to spice it up a little. Before long, I discover a tuft of chives growing at the base of some rocks. Perfect. I chop them very fine and add them to the pot... put on the lid, and let the whole thing stew."

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